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Antiquarian at Greenwich

Bruce Crane "Twilight" Oil on Canvas

$52,000.00

Call For Location | 203-325-8070


55 1/2" High X 56 1/2" Wide

A Oil on Canvas by Bruce Crane 1857-1937.  Titled "Twilight" with extensive provenance labels on back.   Sold by Hirschl and Adler.

Provenance- 

Grand Central Art Galleries, New York.  (label on back) 
Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York. (label on back)
Anon. sale, Hindman Auctions, Chicago, 12 May 2013, lot 16.


Robert Bruce Crane (1857-1937) was an American painter.   In the early 1900's he joined the Old Lyme Colony- one of the most famous art colonies of its time established by painter Henry ward Ranger.   Cranes's success gained traction after 1920, when he began producing oil sketches of woods, meadows and hills during the autumn of his career. 

It was a summer trip with his father to the Adirondacks that sparked Crane's interest in painting after witnessing the work of young female amateur artists at local exhibitions.  His father was an amateur artist himself, and introduced Crane to the New York Art scene from a young age. 

In 1874, when Crane was seventeen, he moved to Elizabeth, New Jersey with his family where he worked as a draftsman for an architect. Hoping this would eventually be his career, he approached the famed artist Alexander Wyant and asked to begin an apprentice ship with him.   Wyant asked to see Cranes's work, but the artist was not yet confident enough in his skills, and was afraid he would not impress Wyant.  He therefore denied Wyant's request, instead he spent the next year improving his skills.   After that period he showed Wyant his progress and they remained friends until Wyant's death.  

Crane developed the artistic style of tonalism under the influence of Jean Charles Cazin at Grez-Sur-Loing.   He went on to create some of his best works- which were predominantly fall and winter scenes.   He enjoyed painting in his studio in Bronxville New York.  It was there that he was able to draw from memories of his outdoor sketching experiences. 

Throughout the first two decades of the 20th century, Crane won at least 10 major national and international awards.   They include the Inness Gold Metal (1901),  Gold Medal at the St. Louis Exposistion (1904),  Bronze Medal at Carnegie Institure exhibition for "November Hills"(1909),  The Saltus Medal (1912) and the silver medal at the Panama-Pacific Exhibition (1915).    From 1929 to 1933, Bruce Crane was the President of the famed Salmagundi Club of New York City (founded in 1871).  He was also its artist of the year in 1902..  In 1897, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate Academician, and became a full Academician in 1901.  He was associated with the Grand Central Art Galleries (This painting retains its G.G.A.G label on rear)

Antiquarian at Greenwich

Bruce Crane "Twilight" Oil on Canvas

$52,000.00 ,

CURRENTLY ON HOLD

A Oil on Canvas by Bruce Crane 1857-1937.  Titled "Twilight" with extensive provenance labels on back.   Sold by Hirschl and Adler.

Provenance- 

Grand Central Art Galleries, New York.  (label on back) 
Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York. (label on back)
Anon. sale, Hindman Auctions, Chicago, 12 May 2013, lot 16.


Robert Bruce Crane (1857-1937) was an American painter.   In the early 1900's he joined the Old Lyme Colony- one of the most famous art colonies of its time established by painter Henry ward Ranger.   Cranes's success gained traction after 1920, when he began producing oil sketches of woods, meadows and hills during the autumn of his career. 

It was a summer trip with his father to the Adirondacks that sparked Crane's interest in painting after witnessing the work of young female amateur artists at local exhibitions.  His father was an amateur artist himself, and introduced Crane to the New York Art scene from a young age. 

In 1874, when Crane was seventeen, he moved to Elizabeth, New Jersey with his family where he worked as a draftsman for an architect. Hoping this would eventually be his career, he approached the famed artist Alexander Wyant and asked to begin an apprentice ship with him.   Wyant asked to see Cranes's work, but the artist was not yet confident enough in his skills, and was afraid he would not impress Wyant.  He therefore denied Wyant's request, instead he spent the next year improving his skills.   After that period he showed Wyant his progress and they remained friends until Wyant's death.  

Crane developed the artistic style of tonalism under the influence of Jean Charles Cazin at Grez-Sur-Loing.   He went on to create some of his best works- which were predominantly fall and winter scenes.   He enjoyed painting in his studio in Bronxville New York.  It was there that he was able to draw from memories of his outdoor sketching experiences. 

Throughout the first two decades of the 20th century, Crane won at least 10 major national and international awards.   They include the Inness Gold Metal (1901),  Gold Medal at the St. Louis Exposistion (1904),  Bronze Medal at Carnegie Institure exhibition for "November Hills"(1909),  The Saltus Medal (1912) and the silver medal at the Panama-Pacific Exhibition (1915).    From 1929 to 1933, Bruce Crane was the President of the famed Salmagundi Club of New York City (founded in 1871).  He was also its artist of the year in 1902..  In 1897, he was elected into the National Academy of Design as an Associate Academician, and became a full Academician in 1901.  He was associated with the Grand Central Art Galleries (This painting retains its G.G.A.G label on rear)

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