My Cart

Close
Harbor View is now Avery & Dash Collections

Fontainebleau Fine Art

"L’Athlète Nue" by Louis Latapie (French, 1891-1972) Circa 1950

$0.00

Call For Location | 203-325-8070


"L’Athlète Nue" – Circa 1950

Signed latapie lower right

Oil on canvas – Very good condition

25 ⅝ x 19 ¾    (65 x 50 cm) without frame

 

Beautiful original, gilded and black-patinated, carved-wood, Spanish-style frame float mounting

 

Certificate of authenticity # 573 delivered by the daughter of the artist Ms. Laure Latapie.

This work will be included in the Catalogue Raisonné of Louis Latapie.

 

Louis Latapie is a French artist whose work develops, through still lifes and feminine nudes, to the limits of a powerfully colored Cubism. In the 1950’s, the simplification of forms brought him closer to Abstraction.

 

Drawing since childhood, Latapie enrolled at the “Ecole des Beaux Arts” in Paris where he befriended future famous cubist sculptor Jacques Lipchitz. Eager to learn, he also attended the prestigious “Académie Julian” and “Académie Ranson”. There, he discovered with Paul Sérusier the principles of Cubism urging them to "seek the third dimension" and "create an art that represents nothing".

After having courageously fought in WWI, struck by multiple wounds, Latapie returned to his studio in 1920 and became a professor at the Ranson Academy. He is introduced to intellectual and avant-garde circles, befriending Max Jacob, Jacques Villon, Jean Metzinger and had a number of personal exhibitions at the renowned Galerie Druet.

In 1923, he associated himself with prominent cubist artists Georges Braque and Roger Bissière in a friendship that would be mutually beneficial and would last for over forty years. They formed the "Beavers of Montsouris" building original houses of cubic structure. That same year with Bissière, Latapie held an important exhibit in New York.

Then, he settled in Toulon (on the Mediterranean coast) where he met Juan Gris, the “Monk of Cubism” and launched a free painting academy.

 

Mobilized again to fight in WWII, Latapie returned from the war a changed man.

After the asceticism of Cubism, the artist is won over by the luxuriance of the Southern light and by the carnation of women. All his life, his work will be dominated by the need to add to the strictness of Cubism the lyricism of color: "Is it my fault if in a deep breath I inhale Cubism and exhale Fauvism?” the artist answered to art critics.

In Louis Latapie's generous art, the female nude plays a vital role. From the 1920’s until his death, it is the subject of many paintings, like a leitmotiv with multiple variations. The nude is often alone. With the theme of caryatids, he isolates the female figure in a vertical format, in a classic hieratic posture. It became a priority in his Southern period, in a violence of colors and a simplification of forms never reached until then.

By the end of the 1950’s, his painting turned to abstraction, where the nudes disarticulate to become nested forms.

 

 

Like many of his colleagues of the post-war avant-garde in Paris, having both pursued and inherited the lessons of the multiple daring pictorial experiments of the beginning of the 20th C, Latapie had the responsibility of introducing a sense of tradition and strove successfully to re-instill the Classicist element.

 

A Renaissance man, Latapie excelled in multiple fields: pottery, mosaic even writing and was commissioned for large murals and tapestries executed by the world famous French “Manufactures d’Aubusson de Beauvais et des Gobelins”.

 

Today, the work of Louis Latapie is fully integrated into the history of 20th C Art and takes its rightful place in its iconic chapters federated by Cubism. Counting among the young painters of his generation, gifted and receptive to great innovative movements, Louis Latapie was born into painting by adopting Cubism then in full bloom. A belonging that he will nurture with his personal vision of beings and things leading him to master a Plastic language whose unity and style identify the artist immediately.

 

Ultimately, Latapie affirms the essential character of painting, emphasizing the intrinsic qualities and nature of the medium. The traces of pictorial activity on the canvas are the fascinating outward signs of a profoundly individual imagination contained within an objective system.

 

  • Exhibitions:

Louis Latapie was a highly celebrated artist who enjoyed an international reputation. During his long career (he started to show in 1912) he exhibited regularly at the major career-launching Paris Salons, including the “Salon des Indépendants”, the “Salon d’Automne” and the “Salon des Tuileries”.

He had numerous individual and group exhibitions worldwide including the Venice Biennale in 1928 and “Art et Résistance” at the “Musée d’Art Moderne”, Paris 1946.

In 1971, just before his death, he was honored, like Braque and Picasso, with a major retrospective at the “Palais des Papes” in Avignon.

Further comprehensive retrospectives of his work were held in 1988 at the “Musée Rapin” (Villeneuve-sur-Lot) and the “Musée des Augustins” (Toulouse).

 

  • Museums:

The artist is represented in many major public collections including in Paris the “Musée National d’Art Moderne”, the “Centre Georges Pompidou” and the “Musée Municipal d’Art Moderne” as well as in Toulouse, Avignon, Lille, Bordeaux… and abroad at the Museums of Modern Art in Geneva, Switzerland and Bilbao, Spain.

 

  • Literature:

- René Massat: Louis Latapie, 1968.

- Lydia Harambourg: Louis Latapie, 2003

- Louis Latapie: Patafioles. Autobiographical writings, 2005

- Benezit: Dictionary of Artists, 2006

- Lydia Harambourg: Dictionary of Painters of the School of Paris, 1945-1965, 2010

 

Fontainebleau Fine Art

"L’Athlète Nue" by Louis Latapie (French, 1891-1972) Circa 1950

Call For Price and Availability | 203-325-8070


"L’Athlète Nue" – Circa 1950

Signed latapie lower right

Oil on canvas – Very good condition

25 ⅝ x 19 ¾    (65 x 50 cm) without frame

 

Beautiful original, gilded and black-patinated, carved-wood, Spanish-style frame float mounting

 

Certificate of authenticity # 573 delivered by the daughter of the artist Ms. Laure Latapie.

This work will be included in the Catalogue Raisonné of Louis Latapie.

 

Louis Latapie is a French artist whose work develops, through still lifes and feminine nudes, to the limits of a powerfully colored Cubism. In the 1950’s, the simplification of forms brought him closer to Abstraction.

 

Drawing since childhood, Latapie enrolled at the “Ecole des Beaux Arts” in Paris where he befriended future famous cubist sculptor Jacques Lipchitz. Eager to learn, he also attended the prestigious “Académie Julian” and “Académie Ranson”. There, he discovered with Paul Sérusier the principles of Cubism urging them to "seek the third dimension" and "create an art that represents nothing".

After having courageously fought in WWI, struck by multiple wounds, Latapie returned to his studio in 1920 and became a professor at the Ranson Academy. He is introduced to intellectual and avant-garde circles, befriending Max Jacob, Jacques Villon, Jean Metzinger and had a number of personal exhibitions at the renowned Galerie Druet.

In 1923, he associated himself with prominent cubist artists Georges Braque and Roger Bissière in a friendship that would be mutually beneficial and would last for over forty years. They formed the "Beavers of Montsouris" building original houses of cubic structure. That same year with Bissière, Latapie held an important exhibit in New York.

Then, he settled in Toulon (on the Mediterranean coast) where he met Juan Gris, the “Monk of Cubism” and launched a free painting academy.

 

Mobilized again to fight in WWII, Latapie returned from the war a changed man.

After the asceticism of Cubism, the artist is won over by the luxuriance of the Southern light and by the carnation of women. All his life, his work will be dominated by the need to add to the strictness of Cubism the lyricism of color: "Is it my fault if in a deep breath I inhale Cubism and exhale Fauvism?” the artist answered to art critics.

In Louis Latapie's generous art, the female nude plays a vital role. From the 1920’s until his death, it is the subject of many paintings, like a leitmotiv with multiple variations. The nude is often alone. With the theme of caryatids, he isolates the female figure in a vertical format, in a classic hieratic posture. It became a priority in his Southern period, in a violence of colors and a simplification of forms never reached until then.

By the end of the 1950’s, his painting turned to abstraction, where the nudes disarticulate to become nested forms.

 

 

Like many of his colleagues of the post-war avant-garde in Paris, having both pursued and inherited the lessons of the multiple daring pictorial experiments of the beginning of the 20th C, Latapie had the responsibility of introducing a sense of tradition and strove successfully to re-instill the Classicist element.

 

A Renaissance man, Latapie excelled in multiple fields: pottery, mosaic even writing and was commissioned for large murals and tapestries executed by the world famous French “Manufactures d’Aubusson de Beauvais et des Gobelins”.

 

Today, the work of Louis Latapie is fully integrated into the history of 20th C Art and takes its rightful place in its iconic chapters federated by Cubism. Counting among the young painters of his generation, gifted and receptive to great innovative movements, Louis Latapie was born into painting by adopting Cubism then in full bloom. A belonging that he will nurture with his personal vision of beings and things leading him to master a Plastic language whose unity and style identify the artist immediately.

 

Ultimately, Latapie affirms the essential character of painting, emphasizing the intrinsic qualities and nature of the medium. The traces of pictorial activity on the canvas are the fascinating outward signs of a profoundly individual imagination contained within an objective system.

 

  • Exhibitions:

Louis Latapie was a highly celebrated artist who enjoyed an international reputation. During his long career (he started to show in 1912) he exhibited regularly at the major career-launching Paris Salons, including the “Salon des Indépendants”, the “Salon d’Automne” and the “Salon des Tuileries”.

He had numerous individual and group exhibitions worldwide including the Venice Biennale in 1928 and “Art et Résistance” at the “Musée d’Art Moderne”, Paris 1946.

In 1971, just before his death, he was honored, like Braque and Picasso, with a major retrospective at the “Palais des Papes” in Avignon.

Further comprehensive retrospectives of his work were held in 1988 at the “Musée Rapin” (Villeneuve-sur-Lot) and the “Musée des Augustins” (Toulouse).

 

  • Museums:

The artist is represented in many major public collections including in Paris the “Musée National d’Art Moderne”, the “Centre Georges Pompidou” and the “Musée Municipal d’Art Moderne” as well as in Toulouse, Avignon, Lille, Bordeaux… and abroad at the Museums of Modern Art in Geneva, Switzerland and Bilbao, Spain.

 

  • Literature:

- René Massat: Louis Latapie, 1968.

- Lydia Harambourg: Louis Latapie, 2003

- Louis Latapie: Patafioles. Autobiographical writings, 2005

- Benezit: Dictionary of Artists, 2006

- Lydia Harambourg: Dictionary of Painters of the School of Paris, 1945-1965, 2010

 

Join our Mailing List

Sign up to receive updates on what's happening at Avery & Dash

My Cart

Subtotal: $0.00

Your cart is currently empty.